Communism is a Powerful Anti-Christian Heresy


Ultimate_Things.jpg

Ultimate Things | Dennis E. Engleman

Throughout the Church age, the mystery of iniquity worked subtly and insidiously to foster unbelief. Satanically inspired humanism, which had received such impetus during the Renaissance and Enlightenment, reached its nihilistic nadir in the early twentieth century in the form of atheistic communism. The utopian ideology which is at the root of communism, and in fact of most secular thought, is seldom clearly realized even by its adherents; it has become part of the unexamined ideological inheritance of the post-Enlightenment era.

“One has to realize what communism is,” insisted Father Seraphim Rose. “Not merely a power-mad political regime, but an ideological-religious system whose aim is to overthrow and supplant all other systems, most of all Christianity.

Communism is actually a very powerful heresy whose central thesis . . . is chiliasm or millennialism: history is to reach its culmination in an indefinite state of earthly blessedness, a perfect mankind living in perfect peace and harmony.”

Communism specifically attacked the land[s] which had most nearly retained her [their] ancient Christian traditions – Holy Russia [Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, Serbia]. Propaganda portrayed Bolshevism as a political/social uprising, which is what gullible individuals throughout the world still imagine it to have been. But the “revolution” was far more than this – it was actually a battle against Christianity.

The Bolesheviks hated not only the emperor, but everything he represented. They were not content to see him deposed, but wanted him and every member of his family killed, so that the ancient link of Christian monarchy extending back to Constantinople the Great would be forever severed.”

. . . more

Comments

  1. Dean Scourtes says:

    I do believe that Communism represented a type of evil depicted by St. John of Patmos in The Book or Revelations – arrogant powers of this world that promote themselves as rivals and competitors to God for men’s loyalties and who persecute God’s people. During the time of St. John of Patmos it was the Emperor Nero who proclaimed himself a god and murdered Christians, 70 years ago it was Stalin.

    The Russian Orthodox Church marked the 70th anniversary of the bloodiest peak of Josef Stalin’s terror with a procession that began from a remote northern island archipelago that became the prison camp immortalized in Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s world famous book, The Gulag Archipelago.

    The procession ended in August on the edge of Moscow at a former “killing field” that has now become a shrine to Soviet leader Stalin’s millions of victims.

    …On some days, hundreds were shot. Photographs of victims from their KGB case files are displayed near the field and in the church. When secret police files were uncovered after the collapse of communism, researchers discovered that one thousand of the victims were monks, nuns, priests and lay people who were chosen for execution because of their Orthodox faith. More than 320 such new martyrs have now been canonized. Fr. Kirill’s grandfather, a priest named Vladimir Ambartsumov, is one of the new martyrs commemorated at Butovo.

    Patriarch Alexei II has referred repeatedly to the site as Russia’s Golgotha. Every year after Easter, the patriarch presides at an open-air Liturgy and memorial service at Butovo.

    “Stalin’s victims honored in emotional memorial”, InCommunion
    http://incommunion.org/articles/previous-issues/in-communion-fall-2007-issue-47