Iran eyes badges for Jews and Christians

National Post Chris Wattie May 19, 2006

Law would require non-Muslim insignia

Human rights groups are raising alarms over a new law passed by the Iranian parliament that would require the country’s Jews and Christians to wear coloured badges to identify them and other religious minorities as non-Muslims.

“This is reminiscent of the Holocaust,” said Rabbi Marvin Hier, the dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles. “Iran is moving closer and closer to the ideology of the Nazis.”

Iranian expatriates living in Canada yesterday confirmed reports that the Iranian parliament, called the Islamic Majlis, passed a law this week setting a dress code for all Iranians, requiring them to wear almost identical “standard Islamic garments.”

The law, which must still be approved by Iran’s “Supreme Guide” Ali Khamenehi before being put into effect, also establishes special insignia to be worn by non-Muslims.

Iran’s roughly 25,000 Jews would have to sew a yellow strip of cloth on the front of their clothes, while Christians would wear red badges and Zoroastrians would be forced to wear blue cloth.

. . . more

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9 thoughts on “Iran eyes badges for Jews and Christians”

  1. New law? NEW??? This is simply standard operating procedure for “Protected Peoples” under Islam! You want to be able at a glance to tell an infidel from a Beliver. How sad that Islamic history is so little known! THis is how the Ottomans did it, why would anyone expect the Iranians to know or think any different?
    The good Rabbi is mistaken. It isn’t reminiscent of the Holocaust, the way Germans did it was reminiscent of the Turks. By the way, to quote a German source, “Who remembers the Armenians?”. Or as Turk might say, “What Armenians?”. Here is what happens when Islam really runs things. The west better wise up.

  2. Religious Dress Codes in Iran: Resolution of Controversy: Not a Fraud

    Here is the explanation given at Powerline.com

    http://powerlineblog.com/archives/014189.php

    Amir Taheri is a well respected journalist with a long track record.

    Reeuters reports that Canada’s National Post has retracted Amir Taheri’s report that the Iranian clothing law will require religious minorities to wear color-coded strips. The New York Daily News evinces nothing but Schadenfreude regarding the New York Post in reporting on the retraction.

    I am struck, however, by the lack of interest in the undisputed component of the law on which Taheri focused. Taheri reported that the the Iranian Majlis had adopted legislation that prescribed the clothing to be worn by Muslims:

    The law mandates the government to make sure that all Iranians wear “standard Islamic garments” designed to remove ethnic and class distinctions reflected in clothing, and to eliminate “the influence of the infidel” on the way Iranians, especially, the young dress.
    Taheri also reported that the law “envisages separate dress codes for religious minorities, Christians, Jews and Zoroastrians.” It is the latter element of the law that generated the furor, but I have not seen any report taking issue with Taheri’s account of the pending imposition of an Islamic dress code. If such a dress code were to become effective, religiously based noncompliance (assuming it is permitted) would identify the offenders as non-Muslims or infidels. Along with Reuters and the Daily News, the mainstream media have overlooked this apparently troubling consideration.

    JOHN adds: Amir Taheri explains:

    REGARDING the Iran dress code story, it seems that some media outlets used my column as the basis for reports that jumped the gun.
    As far as my article is concerned, I stand by it.

    The law has been passed by the Islamic Majlis and will now be submitted to the Council of Guardians. A committee has been appointed to work out the modalities of implementation.

    Many ideas are being discussed with regard to implementation of the dress code – including special markers, known as zonnars, for followers of Judaism, Christianity and Zoroastrianism….

    I do not know which of these ideas, if any, will be eventually adopted. We will know once the committee appointed to discuss them presents its report, perhaps in September.

    As Scott notes, it is hard to see how Iran can regulate the clothing worn by Muslims without also regulating the clothing worn by non-Muslims, either explicitly or implicitly.

    Posted by Scott at 06:24 AM

  3. Note 6 What was NOT retracted: mandatory Muslim dress

    Dean, thanks for the link. Again, please look at what was NOT retracted: the assertion that Iran was considering a law which would require ALL MUSLIMS to wear a certain style of “traditional” Muslim dress. This would be a religion based dress code.

    Now imagine that you were a non-Muslim living in a country with a 95% Muslim population. Please further imagine that virtually ALL of your Muslim neighbors and co-workers wore a particular and distinctive style of dress. IF YOU DID NOT wear that style of dress, you would be IDENTIFIED as a non-Muslim on sight.

    Mandatory religious based dress codes DO NOT HAVE TO ADD A YELLOW STAR OR A CROSS to minorities IF they ADD A SYMBOLIC CRESCENT to everyone else.

  4. FACT.
    In Iran all shops owned by non-moslems (infidels) must have a sign identifying them as such so that moslems don’t enter them and get defiled!

  5. Toni, you Islamophobe!!!

    Toni, you need to understand that other cultures see things differently. For instance, Ayatollah Khomeini made clear that kaffirs are najlis. “Unbelievers” are “filth.” is the loose translation.

    Failure to accept the Islamic view of non-Muslims is an egregious instance of Islamophobia and intolerance.

    You should be sent for multi-culturalist re-education.

    Please also note that Muslims kill people when they are offended by ideas or speech, so if you say something offensive to Muslims you are responsible for the predictable deaths inflicted by Muslims.

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