Set in Stone

Kintsvisi Orthodox Christian Monastery

Kintsvisi Orthodox Christian Monastery

I first heard about the Kintsvisi monastery in the summer of 2008, while working as a photographer covering the Russian invasion of Northern Georgia. My Georgian friends, who took part in the war, told me about a remote monastery that had been active since the 11th century, except during the Communist era. Intrigued, I tried to make time to visit, but was busy covering the short, intense conflict. Still, I wanted to see firsthand this pure form of Orthodox monasticism that has survived almost untouched for 16 centuries, thanks to the monks’ resilient sense of tradition.

In December 2009 I had an opportunity to visit. With some good contacts, I hoped to obtain permission to photograph the monks’ lives. After a few days, I received permission to visit and was driven to a remote portion of the Kartli region, not far from the frontline with South Ossetia.

The monastery, situated high in the mountains, clings to the side of a steep embankment. From a ravine, a single road winds up the mountains and leads to a large, three-story building. A young monk greeted me, showed me around and explained how the monks were able to raise funds to build these buildings in such a precarious physical position, which are designed to accommodate visitors and worshipers. Soon after, I was introduced to the abbot of the monastery, an austere-looking, 40-year-old man. It took him a while to grant my request to take photographs, since the monks’ lives are lived largely in secrecy and with respect for their contemplative Orthodox tradition, which dates to the fourth century. Finally, I was allowed to begin photographing.

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View a slideshow of beautiful photographs from the Kintsvisi monastery.

Read the entire article on the America Magazine website (new window will open).

Date posted: june 10, 2010