Kurdistan

Wall Street Opinion Journal Judith Miller October 28, 2006

A conversation with the president of Iraq’s most successful region.

ERBIL, Iraq–Unlike Baghdad, 200 miles away, the air here does not echo with the sound of gunfire, car bombs and helicopters. Residents of this city of a million people picnic by day in pristine new parks and sip tea with friends and relatives at night. American forces are not “occupiers” or the “enemy,” but “liberators.” Mentioning President Bush evokes smiles–and not of derision.

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Unholy Month of Ramadan: Persecution of Assyrians Increases in Iraq

Asia News October 18, 2006

Fasting from sunrise to sunset is a struggle for Muslims during this month of Ramadan. The month will present a more dangerous struggle for non-Muslims in Iraq, against whom Islamic terrorists promise to increase their violence.

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Don’t Look at Us!

Wall Street Best of the Web James Taranto October 17, 2006

“British Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett last week issued the latest European demand to close down the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,” The Washington Post reports. “The existence of the prison is ‘unacceptable’ and fuels Islamic radicalism around the world, she said, echoing a recent chorus of complaints from Europe about U.S. counterterrorism policy.”

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Some 500 people attend funeral of beheaded priest

Asia News October 12, 2006

Relatives confirm that US$ 350,000 ransom was demanded. Sunni Ulema Council condemns the killing: “a cowardly murder [. . .] committed by people who want [. . .] to start a religious war”.

Mosul (AsiaNews) – Some 500 people attended yesterday the funeral of Fr Paulos Eskandar at Mosul’s Syrian-Orthodox St Ephrem Church. Father Eskandar, who was abducted on Monday, was founded beheaded some time later.

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Decapitated Syrian-Orthodox priest laid to rest in Mosul

Asia News October

Funeral held today. Captors demanded public apologies for Benedict XVI’s Regensburg address and payment of US$ 250-350,000 ransom. Christians are enduring more brutal violence; a 14-year boy is crucified.

Mosul (AsiaNews) – Fr Paulos Eskandar was laid to rest in Mosul today. The decapitated body of the Syrian-Orthodox priest was found in an eastern district of this Iraqi city yesterday. He was abducted last Monday by an unknown Islamic group which posted a hefty ransom of 0-350,000, the Assyrian International News Agency (AINA) reported. The group also demanded that signs be posted on his church apologising for the Pope’s Regensburg remarks as a pre-condition for negotiations.

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Iraqis to Consider Autonomous Regions

My Way News Qassim Abdul-Zahra September 25, 2006

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) – Iraq’s feuding ethnic and sectarian groups agreed Sunday to consider amending the constitution and begin debating legislation to create a federated nation, while the Shiite prime minister appealed for an end to violence during Ramadan.

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Orthodox Church Archbishop attacks ‘Islamic fanaticism’

African News Dimension Zimgreats. com September 17, 2006

Johannesburg (AND) In yet another furore to grip the Christian community, the head of the Orthodox Church of Greece has joined the Pope controversy by attacking what he calls Islamic fanaticism in Africa.

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War Inside the Wire

Wall Street Opinion Journal James Taranto September 16, 2006

GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba — You might call Rear Adm. Harry Harris a jailer. As commander of Joint Task Force Guantanamo, a job he has held for six months, he is in charge of one of the world’s best-known detention facilities. But if you call this place a prison, he will correct you.

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Fit and Unfit to Print: What are the obligations of the press in wartime?

Wall Street Opinion Journal June 30, 2006

“Not everything is fit to print. There is to be regard for at least probable factual accuracy, for danger to innocent lives, for human decencies, and even, if cautiously, for nonpartisan considerations of the national interest.”

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Arabian Knight: One man’s crusade to help Arab-American Christians assimilate.

Wall Street Journal Online Paulette Chu Miniter June 30, 2006

YORK, Pa.–Three days before terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was killed by a U.S. air strike in Iraq, Pastor Moussa Joseph Moussa led a group of 500 believers in praying for the insurgency to be defeated. After the bombing, Mr. Moussa says, “I really believe that because we prayed, God dealt with the evil forces.”

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The war for moral superiority

Townhall.com Diana West June 26, 2006

I can see it now — I think.

It’s on the right-hand page of a book by or about Winston Churchill, and it is a quotation by Churchill on the subject on war — specifically, what happens to a civilized society when it goes to war with a barbarous one. I can’t find it (yet), but what I remember as being the main point was that if — if — the civilized society is to prevail over the barbarous one, it will necessarily and tragically be degraded by the experience as a vital cost of victory. Partly, this is because civilized war tactics are apt to fail against barbarous war tactics, thus requiring civilized society to break the “rules” if it is to survive a true death struggle. It is also because the clash itself — the act of engaging with the barbarous society — forces civilization to confront, repel and also internalize previously unimagined depredations. This is degrading, too.

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Uncovering Iraq’s Horrors in Desert Graves

New York Times John Burns June 5, 2006

ON THE EDGE OF THE ASH SHAM DESERT, Iraq, June 3 — Among experts on the American-led team investigating Iraq’s mass graves, the skeletal remains lying face-up at the rear of the tangled grave here have been given a name — the Blue Man — that speaks for a sorrowful familiarity developed by some of those who work with victims of mass murder.

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‘In the Hands of God’

Washington Post Kristin Henderson Sunday, April 30, 2006

For chaplains in Iraq, the constant battle is the fear, loneliness and tedium that can test a soldier’s faith Text and photographs

Just before sunrise on a foggy road outside Mosul, Iraq, a convoy of supply trucks lumbers from one forward operating base to another. On this December morning, the convoy is escorted by a dozen armored U.S. Army vehicles, including a Humvee with a three-man crew — artillerymen farmed out to the 142nd Combat Support Battalion and retrained for convoy security. This is some of the most dangerous duty a soldier can pull in Iraq because insurgents target convoys with their weapon of choice: improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. Among service members, IEDs are the single greatest cause of death. Blast wounds account for 90 percent of the injuries at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

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Dissident President

Wall Street Opinion Journal Natan Sharansky April 24, 2006

George W. Bush has the courage to speak out for freedom.

There are two distinct marks of a dissident. First, dissidents are fired by ideas and stay true to them no matter the consequences. Second, they generally believe that betraying those ideas would constitute the greatest of moral failures. Give up, they say to themselves, and evil will triumph. Stand firm, and they can give hope to others and help change the world.

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The West vs. Christianity?

Ed. A reader sent this link.

Russian News and Information Agency Pyotr Romanov March 4, 2006

While recognizing the universal and appropriate appeals for tolerance for Muslims, I’d like to draw your attention to the strange attitude of the Western political elite, which has recently become so acute. I do not know what stands behind the lack of foresight, but too many of the political elite’s actions have dealt a devastating blow to Christianity.

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