The more I hate men individually, the more I love humanity.

The more I love humanity in general the less I love man in particular. In my dreams, I often make plans for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually face crucifixion if it were suddenly necessary. Yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone for two days together. I know from experience. As soon as anyone is near me, his personality disturbs me and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because he’s too long over his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I hate men individually the more I love humanity.

Fyodor Dostoevsky “The Brothers Karamazov”

Comments

  1. paradosis says:

    typo: He accomplished all this not because he was ethical and did not stand for foolishness.

  2. paradosis says:

    99) Mr. Chris, I don’t know what dictionary was used in your instruction but you have some strange definitions. Fortunately, I learned from Socrates to define terms, so I shrug you inability to communicate off on your foreign language.

    FYI I was a great saker, with clear complexion. There were no Mercedes Benz in our neighborhood. I didn’t know what one was until I went to university and there was a homosexual in my design class who drove a 450SL that belonged to his sugar daddy.

    Your poor wife! She must get really frustrated after watching sports with you all the time, only to have to listen to your nonstop ridicule during an occassional Disney family film.

    My dad told great stories. He was a mechanic in the Army Air Corps (no Air Force then); his color blindness probably saved his life otherwise he’d have been a gunner in a B52. He was stationed in England and France in the same outfit with a real tall guy named LaPierre from LA. LaPierre dug himself a real BIG foxhole. One night the Natzi’s shelled them and everyone went running for cover. My dad and a buddy jumped into LaPierre’s great BIG one, and LaPierre had to jump into one of their smaller ones. My dad and his buddy both fit into LaPierre’s, but there was poor LaPierre all scrunched up in one of theirs. My dad would start to laugh at the end, but what was most entertaining was the way he would tell stories and his Texas accent. Lah-Pea-Air came out something more like “loppy-ear” and I’d crack up every time I heard it and pictured LaPierre with his knees to his chest (I’m 6-3 so I can relate)!

  3. paradosis,

    If your 85 -88, wouldn’t you be the WWII vet? Or are you saying you were born between (19)85-(19) 88? Your figures are not adding up. Your Mother is 80, your father died (presumably w/in a year or two) at 84 and you are 85-88? or maybe that you finished high school between 85-88.

    StallFamily.NET brings up nothing on Google, even when you put www in front of it. I am curious though, why are you still here if you disagree so vehemently with the posters? You have your opinion and interpretation of the “Word” as they (and all) have of their’s. Yet you put yours forward as the “correct” interpretation (eerily, you come across as puritanical), why? You don’t know the truth anymore than me and I am not Orthodox .

    Nope, I am not Orthodox. I came here (and several other sites) to learn more about Orthodoxy which is in my past. The people here are nice; they disagree, agree, argue, etc. like people do. But you have done nothing since your visit but insult others and wallow in self importance. It is no wonder you are having to look for fellow communalists instead of them seeking you out.

    The self reliance stuff is very interesting to me, but I have my suspicions that you are not as interested in that as you are attacking these folks ideals. What exactly do you believe? What makes your (interpretation of) Orthodoxy better than these folks? Why can’t they have their convictions? Why should I (as an admitted outsider) consider or show interest in your form of Orthodoxy?

    Sorry for interrupting everyone (as I read more and rarely post) but I am beginning to think pardaosis is not someone who justs sees things differently but is instead a liar.

    Regards,

  4. paradosis says:

    103) Or are you saying you were born between (19)85-(19) 88?

    No Cepik, Michael Bauman said/asked if I was 85-88, which is why I gave him a C- in reading comprehension (for making me laugh).
    So yes, you’re math is correct and you are absolutely right about Michael’s not adding up, and I’m not a vet.
    You’re on the right track, so keep working at reading instead of reading into and you’ll get there if you really want to communicate with me.

    If you are genuinely generally interested in the self-reliance “stuff”, what I’ve tried to say here that you have not understood, or anything else (TX weather, etc.) then talk to me one on one via “info at” paradosis.info. I was able to connect to my site the way you say you weren’t by entering in both initial/all caps and all lowercase. Nothing comes up at google for your search because my pages aren’t titled as such.

    If you’re only intent is take sides against me like has already been done, then don’t bother and please do not address your post to me, then everyone else but me in your closing within your note. It’s like talking about your child in his/her presence as if they aren’t there.

    I apologize for leaving you with a bad impression; I am capable and resolved to do better.

    PS: the crux of OrthodoxyToday as always is a life of prayer; “lifestyle” can have a lot to add or subtract from that
    Tell Scott kranestew hi for me when you see him ;)

  5. note 104

    I’m around, going to and fro in the earth, and walking up and down in it.

  6. paradosis says:

    105
    The weather in your neck of the woods is much more conducive toward that than here. I’m sweating it out until fall/winter.
    The hills are alive . . .

  7. D. George says:

    paradosis:

    I’m a little confused as to what you want us to do, so if you will entertain some yes/no questions I would appreciate it. If you are so kind as to respond, feel free to write a few sentences, but please answer yes or no at the beginning of your responses.

    Is working in exchange for a paycheck unorthodox?

    Is living in a co-housing arrangement more Orthodox than living in a house solely owned by the occupant?

    Is living in a small house more Orthodox than living in a large house?

    Is growing one’s own food and joining a coop more Orthodox than mining phosphate for fertilizer, producing oil for fuel, or manufacturing circuit boards?

    Is the Internet more Orthodox than television?

    Is a vegetarian diet more Orthodox than a diet that includes meat?

    Is agrarian living more Orthodox than urban or suburban living?

    Does a high degree of freedom in society necessarily erode what you would identify as Orthodox culture?

    Would our country have a realistic chance of survival if all Americans lived just like you wish to live?

  8. paradosis says:

    I’m a little confused as to what you want us to do,

    define “conservative in a way that is more broadly Orthodox Christian that cannot easily be confused or seen as synonymous with the “christian right” whose ideas/values often can be informed by a michmach of millenarianism, American exceptionalism, puritanism, pietism, “christian” zionism, moralism, American civic religion, etc. Such is no “ally” with Orthodox Christianity; try revealing Orthodox Christianity to someone who holds such ideals and you may quickly find this to be so; instead of being labeled “liberal” you may instead be pigeonholed an “idolator” for “worshipping icons”; and that is only the tip of the iceberg.

    so if you will entertain some yes/no questions I would appreciate it. If you are so kind as to respond, feel free to write a few sentences, but please answer yes or no at the beginning of your responses.

    Is working in exchange for a paycheck unorthodox?

    no

    Is living in a co-housing arrangement more Orthodox than living in a house solely owned by the occupant?

    no

    Is living in a small house more Orthodox than living in a large house?

    no

    Is growing one’s own food and joining a coop more Orthodox than mining phosphate for fertilizer, producing oil for fuel, or manufacturing circuit boards?

    no

    Is the Internet more Orthodox than television?

    no

    Is a vegetarian diet more Orthodox than a diet that includes meat?

    no

    Is agrarian living more Orthodox than urban or suburban living?

    no

    Does a high degree of freedom in society necessarily erode what you would identify as Orthodox culture?

    no

    Would our country have a realistic chance of survival if all Americans lived just like you wish to live?

    I don’t wish all Americans to live just alike; they are free to make their own choices; but the choice I’m making should be an option just as well as others. More people might make it if they thought they had a choice, but currently the culture and economy revolves around urbanization.

  9. paradosis says:

    note 107 D. George, would you be so kind as to answer some questions I have of you?

    What do you think is most culturally important: morality, democracy, capitalism or Orthodox Christianity?

    How do you think your choice (from above) is conducive to a more free and just society?

    What priority do you assign to the following for your life from most to least important: financial income, almsgiving, material possessions, prayer, conservative thinking/action, conservation of nature, living in a “free” society

    Is “quality” of society more or less important than the Orthodox Path of Salvation?

    What type of society/ social conditioning do you think has produced the greatest depth of Orthodox Christianity, a society that is repressive of Christianity or one that indulges sensual pleasure?

    Define “conservative” as you understand the category in American cultural terms.

    Do you think it important to reduce American social engagement to two opposing categories of “conservative” and “liberal”. How is doing so helpful? harmful?

  10. Christopher says:

    note 108:

    define “conservative in a way that is more broadly Orthodox Christian that cannot easily be confused or seen as synonymous with the “christian right”

    This is your hang-up, not ours. All the regular posters here, all the spirit of this site, is not Calvinistic/protestant. I see no need to make a special effort to distinguish myself from something called “the religious right”, in particular sense I don’t find them particularly threatening – liberalism is a much much bigger problem.

    Define “conservative” as you understand the category in American cultural terms.

    Do yourself a favor and purchase Russell Kirk’s, “The Conservative Mind”, and read the introduction. Yes, there is much confusion in our society about what it means to be “conservative”. You yourself display much of that confusion. A key is to understand the difference between libertarianism, and conservatism.

    Do you think it important to reduce American social engagement to two opposing categories of “conservative” and “liberal”. How is doing so helpful? harmful?

    It is very helpful. It is the beginning of the debate, and the beginning of thinking for many many people. Much of the disputes in this society is a simple dichotomy – two ideas that are in many sense the “opposite” of each other. Take the “life issues” for example (i.e. abortion, eugenics, euthanasia, etc.). There really are only two main view’s of anthropology (i.e. what it means to be a human person) in our society: The classical “western” or “Christian” view of man, and the modern utilitarian/materialistic view of man. A conservative holds to the Christian view, the liberal holds to a materialistic view.

    I am all for “nuance” and clarification, but in many many cases liberal/conservative are perfectly good words and good shorthand when speaking/thinking about these issues.

    What’s your problem with the terms “liberal” and “conservative”? Not preachy/prophetic enough for ya? :)

  11. paradosis says:

    define “conservative in a way that is more broadly Orthodox Christian that cannot easily be confused or seen as synonymous with the “christian right”

    This is your hang-up, not ours. All the regular posters here, all the spirit of this site, is not Calvinistic/protestant. I see no need to make a special effort to distinguish myself from something called “the religious right”, in particular sense I don’t find them particularly threatening – liberalism is a much much bigger problem.

    I’m not concerned about that distinction; I think the bigger problem is liberalism.

    Define “conservative” as you understand the category in American cultural terms.

    Do yourself a favor and purchase Russell Kirk’s, “The Conservative Mind”, and read the introduction. Yes, there is much confusion in our society about what it means to be “conservative”. You yourself display much of that confusion. A key is to understand the difference between libertarianism, and conservatism.

    I think if you read Russell Kirk’s “The Conservative Mind”, especially the introduction, it would be helpful to your understanding of “conservative” as referenced here at OT. It is also beneficial to distinguish between libertarianism and conservative.

    Do you think it important to reduce American social engagement to two opposing categories of “conservative” and “liberal”. How is doing so helpful? harmful?

    It is very helpful. It is the beginning of the debate, and the beginning of thinking for many many people. Much of the disputes in this society is a simple dichotomy – two ideas that are in many sense the “opposite” of each other. Take the “life issues” for example (i.e. abortion, eugenics, euthanasia, etc.). There really are only two main view’s of anthropology (i.e. what it means to be a human person) in our society: The classical “western” or “Christian” view of man, and the modern utilitarian/materialistic view of man. A conservative holds to the Christian view, the liberal holds to a materialistic view.

    I am all for “nuance” and clarification, but in many many cases liberal/conservative are perfectly good words and good shorthand when speaking/thinking about these issues.

    What’s your problem with the terms “liberal” and “conservative”? Not preachy/prophetic enough for ya? :)

  12. Christopher says:

    What? Are you editing posts now here at OT??

    HOW OLD ARE YOU???

  13. paradosis says:

    What? Are you editing posts now here at OT??
    HOW OLD ARE YOU???

    Chris, we must have a bad connection. Edging? No, I have to mow first. But hey, I installed a filter on my computer because I keep receiving these frightening images from you. I’m sure this is all my fault because I am completely ignorant, never having read anything by Russell Kirk. I didn’t even know who he was. I hope my filter isn’t causing problems for you. Are you still getting distorted reception from me like that pimply face sacker you said you saw? I must confess I got the filter off someone without confirming their moral status. I’m not sure but they might be a principled manhater, not even a hypocrite. I hope the filter works. I should have asked you for help instead.

    I’m trying really hard to behave myself like you’ve told me I should. I’m not laughing or winking. I know that’s not allowed at monasteries and have heard it generally discouraged within Orthodoxy as it’s considered to encourage passions and to be counterproductive to attaining dispassion. I should have listened to you elder brother. I’m sorry for crossing you. I keep crossing myself and praying that I can bring my passions under control.

    I’m sorry for accusing you of misspelling agarian. My reception of that post from you must have distorted and now it’s miraculously cleared up because I see that you did spell correctly. I am so sorry for all the accusations I made, and hope you will forgive me. I’m running out to get Kirk’s book you recommended right away so I can put a stop to these awful images as soon as possible. I don’t want to wake up tomorrow and find that I have left this undone. I’m even plotting my trip so that I make nothing but right turns, even if it means I have to take the long way home.

    Did you ask how cold are you? No, it’s summer here and hot as _, not cold.
    Hope the static clears up for you on your end. I’m getting that Kirk book ASAP!

  14. Paradosis, the paragraph containing links you provided making fun of Pat Robertson were removed. I won’t allow it.

  15. paradosis says:

    Thanks Fr.J, those images of finger pointing, moral heavyweight lifting, emotive outburst and the beast were frightening me! I hope that clears up the bad connection for Chris too.

  16. paradosis says:

    It’s irresponsible, paradosis. You should know better.

    You’re right Fr.J. I apologize and take responsibility for my action. I think everyone should. It’s the right thing to do. A picture’s worth a thousand words, so the point’s been made, albeit irresponsibly. OrthodoxyToday after all is truly about the image that’s being formed in each of us for beauty or beast. We only have control over the image in ourselves, and no one else.

  17. paradosis says:

    Image is the most powerful means of communication. That’s why art is such a fundamental part of culture, and why advertising has made use of imagery since its earliest days.

  18. Michael Bauman says:

    paradosis, despite what I can only take as juvenile sarcasm, you actually have a good point. Our culture is the reflection of what we have accepted as our image philosophically and spiritually. Right now it is a culture of rebellion and everything is shattered. What Nietzche called the trans-valution of all values has occured. We each of us stand alone crying defiance to the world and those around us. Finding the sores in each other and doing our best to pick at them rather than heal them.

    Sarcasm is an indiscrimately destructive weapon. There are times to use it but they are rare. The worst part about it is that it is quite difficult to use without hardening one’s own heart.

    So what is the image of man you see in the liberal politics of the NCC for instance that is in concord with the Orthodox understanding?

    Here are the big issues that as Christians we ought to address:
    Care for the poor
    Care for the earth
    Care for the innocent and vulnerable
    Creating viable communities
    Doing the things that make for peace and freedom
    Worshipping the Creator rather than the created thing.

    The liberals emote on most of these all the time, but the image of man at the foundation of their thought is anathema to me because it is so at odds with the Orthodox understanding. They deny all of the essentials of what the Church teaches us about ourselves. The conservatives do a little better in some ways but only marginally and fail just as badly in others.

    Faith, economics, and politics are the three great building blocks of culture all depend on the answers to two questions: Who is God? Who are we?

  19. Michael,

    Don’t forget: “Defend the innocent and vulnerable” as well as care for them.

  20. Michael notes: “The liberals emote on most of these all the time, but the image of man at the foundation of their thought is anathema to me because it is so at odds with the Orthodox understanding.”

    So in other words, they’re doing the right things for the wrong reasons? Are you assuming that all liberals are also atheists? I’m not sure what you’re getting at … can you further explain?

    It seems like you’re saying that a liberal can do something benevolent like volunteering at Habitat for Humanity but because they view man as ___ their work has no merit?

    (I left it blank because I’m not sure what you’re assuming the “liberal” view of man is)

  21. Michael Bauman says:

    JamesK,

    They say they have the right intentions, but their actions often do more harm than good because of a fundamental miss understanding of man in society. I’m talking policy actions here, not individual ones. Even with individual actions though the reasons are important. As the poet said, “To do the right deed for the wrong reason is surely the greatest treason.” But in the case of individual actions, the wrong reason mostly effects the person doing the deed.

    But how do you know what is the right deed? If my understanding of humanity is absolutely wrong, or “feelings” and what “ought to be” override reason, or I’m just trying to make myself look good, will I do the right thing? Makes it much more difficult even in the individual area.

  22. Michael Bauman says:

    Chris, absolutely that is really what I intended to say. To me defense is a big part of caring for.

  23. paradosis 104:

    I did visit your site. I enjoyed the article on Dmitri and was unaware that he was originally a Baptist. I found the Holden article interesting and enjoyed the link to “On the Road to Emmaus”. Particularly about the Orthodox Russians who were leading other people to Orthodoxy (family and friends) by setting good examples. I didn’t care for alot of the other stuff, but that is OK since people are entitled to their own opinions. I couldn’t find any self reliance links; only videos about how environmentally concerned Wal Mart is. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong place.

    I wanted to respond to you since you responded to me; I am not as diligent on posting. My intent was to try and point out (politely) that you were coming across as rude and evasive. As I said, I am not Orthodox and cannot take “sides” against you. My last paragraph was directed to you alone, and was not calling out anyone else. I sometimes speak in third person to make a point and in retrospect I could have worded it better, my apologies.

    I have no axe to grind with you (I don’t even know you) and am not teaming up on you. However, I am asking you (the person behind the keyboard) if the “paradosis” character is setting the example you want him to. This character comes onto another site, insults the host and guests, is offensive,evasive and defensive; expresses his views while not considering others’.

    Orthodoxy is in my family history so I would like to learn more about it. What is it that you believe? What style/form/interpretation/brand of Orthodoxy are you portraying? Do you feel you are setting a good example? Do you think you are leading anyone to Orthodoxy (whether it is your style/interpretation/form) by your behavior? Is that even a concern of yours?

    Regards,