Unprotected

FrontPageMagazine.com David Forsmark March 8, 2007

At the beginning of the film Analyze This, the psychologist played by Billy Crystal incredulously asks his gangster patient (Robert DeNiro), “What is my goal here, to make you a happy, well-adjusted gangster?” The Sopranos on HBO has a similar but more serious running theme about the therapy culture’s inadequacy when it comes to matters of right and wrong.

According to an explosive new book, Unprotected: A Campus Psychiatrist Reveals How Political Correctness in Her Profession Endangers Every Student, large numbers of campus shrinks think their job is to turn your children into happy and well-adjusted slutty, amoral, disease-ridden, atheists. Add any element of sexual androgyny to that mix, and it’s really time to put a gold star on the patient chart.

If there’s any challenge to college professors for the title of Most Politically Correct Profession, it comes from the nation’s therapists. The American Psychological Association has spent the last generation “updating” its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual based on political pressure and the latest fads, from changing the discussion of homosexuality to considering UFO Abduction Syndrome as a legitimate billing diagnosis.

While individual therapists might protest that such a charge of professional fatuousness is unfair – just as all lawyers are not represented by the leftish politics of the American Bar Association — the anonymous author of this book certainly makes the case that when you mix the psychological profession and the dominant PC campus bureaucracy, the term “institution” of learning takes on a whole new meaning.

“I once assumed that campus medicine and psychology had one priority: student well-being,” writes author Anonymous, M.D., a discouraged and fed-up campus psychiatrist. “I’m no longer so naïve. Radical politics pervades my profession, and common sense has vanished. … I see the consequences daily. Dangerous behaviors are a personal choice; judgments are prohibited — they might offend.”

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