Election day is great.

I’ve always looked forward to it starting when I was young, sixth grade in fact. Almost every election I am glued to the television (although in the last decade I rely on the internet more), watching the returns come in. There is something special about election day, almost sacred but in the same sense that, say, Gettysburg or Appomattox are sacred, or the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. I need to think about this more (I’ve been meaning to write about the sense of sanctity that surrounds Appomattox for years) but it has something to do with the reference of historical symbols to higher narrative that, if seen and undertood, evokes a sense of reverence towards things that really matter and exhort us to nurture and preserve them. Democracy matters. The orderly transfer of power matters. The virtues that define America, even if poorly or improperly applied at times, matter.

I am a patriot, I really am. I love this country. I wrote a tribute to this great country several years ago (probably more like 15 years ago) as a way of thanking the good people of this great nation for the life and freedom it has offered to so many.

It’s called “Liberty: A six year old boy begins his education about freedom in New York harbor.”

Comments

  1. Jim Holman says:

    For all of you not fortunate enough to live in Oregon (aka God’s Country):

    After hearing about all the difficulties in voting around the country, I have to tell you that the Oregon vote-by-mail system should be envied. No long lines, no malfunctioning voting machines, no rushing to the polling place after work, no hanging chads. What Oregon has done is to take the absentee ballot concept and applied that to the total election. You vote in the comfort of your own dwelling, at your own convenience, drink in hand or not. And if you are a last-minute kind of person and don’t mail the ballot, you can drop it off at a large number of locations around the state.