OrthodoxyToday.org
Commentary on social and moral issues of the day


Civic Engagement

Family Facts Website

  • Print this page
  • Email this page
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Bookmark and Share

October 2006

1. Religious individuals are more likely to give time and money to charities. Compared to secular individuals, religious individuals (defined as those who attended religious service at least once per week or more) were more likely to volunteer at and to give monetarily to religious and non-religious organizations, after controlling for demographic factors. The monetary giving percentages for religious and secular persons were 91 percent and 66 percent, respectively, and the volunteering percentages, 67 percent and 44 percent, respectively.

2. Religious individuals are more likely to perform informal charitable acts. All other things being equal, compared to their secular peers, religious respondents (those who attended religious service once a week or more) were more likely to help out with the homeless, give blood, and exhibit civility and honesty (e.g., return excess change to the store).

3. Individuals who frequently attend religious services are more likely to give money to poverty-relief organizations. Frequency of church attendance was related to charitable giving. Individuals who reported having a high frequency of church attendance were more likely to give money to organizations that help the poor and needy compared to individuals who reported having a low frequency of church attendance.

4. Individuals who frequently participate in religious activities are more likely to vote in presidential elections. Individuals who reported a high frequency of participation in church organizations and activities were, on average, more likely to vote in a presidential election when compared to individuals who reported not participating in church organizations and activities.

5. Religiously active adolescents are more likely to vote in presidential elections as young adults. On average, individuals who reported participating in religious groups and organizations as adolescents were more likely to report voting in a presidential election as young adults when compared to those who reported not participating in religious groups and organizations.

6. Individuals who regularly attend religious services tend to join a greater number of other non-religious organizations as well. Compared with infrequent attendees of religious services (less than once or twice a month), frequent attendees (once a week or more) were 21 percent more likely to belong to three or more non-religious organizations. Over time, frequent attendees who initially belonged to less than three non-religious groups were 58 percent more likely to increase their non-religious memberships.

7. Married individuals are more likely to volunteer for social service. "Married adults were 1.3 times more likely than unmarried adults to have volunteered [for social service], and married adults averaged 1.4 times more volunteer hours than unmarried individuals." In addition, parents were also twice as likely as childless adults to volunteer for social service.

8. Civically active fathers are more likely to spend one-on-one time with their children. Fathers who were actively involved in the civic life of their communities (measured by their levels of participation in civic groups, professional associations, and service organizations) were more likely to engage in one-on-one activities, such as helping out with homework or having private talks, with their children.

9. Adolescents with civically active mothers tend to be civically involved as well. Adolescents' civic involvement was similar to their mothers' civic involvement. Adolescents who reported high levels of civic involvement tended to have mothers who reported high levels of civic involvement, while adolescents reporting low civic involvement tended to have mothers who reported low levels of civic involvement.

10. Individuals whose parents divorce early in their childhood tend to be less trusting of others as adults. Individuals who experienced parental divorce at a young age (from 0 to 4 years) were less likely to trust others as adults. The negative effect was found to be mediated by the quality of the relationship individuals had with their parents during their teens.

Read the entire article on the Family Facts website (new window will open).

Posted: 18-Oct-06



Copyright 2001-2014 OrthodoxyToday.org. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of this article is subject to the policy of the individual copyright holder. Follow copyright link for details.
Copyright 2001-2014 OrthodoxyToday.org. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of this article is subject to the policy of the individual copyright holder. See OrthodoxyToday.org for details.


Article link: