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The U.N. on Cloning: Ban It

Wesley J. Smith

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You Probably Didn't Hear About It, since it received such little media coverage, but last week, by a nearly 3-1 vote, the United Nations General Assembly urged the world to "prohibit all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life."

True, "The United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning," is not legally binding. Still, with 90 members on record as supporting the resolution and only 34 against (with the rest abstaining or absent) the lopsided vote sends a powerful message that the international community overwhelmingly opposes human cloning for any purpose.

Taken aback, supporters of therapeutic cloning are already on spin patrol. The Scientist, for example, asserted ludicrously that only "reproductive cloning" is banned under the resolution. The extremely slender reed cloning advocates have grasped to make this desperate claim was the use of the word "inasmuch" in the Declaration's declarative statement.

This assertion forces us to hit the dictionaries, where we find that "inasmuch" means "seeing that." The word is generally used to introduce a phrase which, according to one source, "explains why or how much something described in another part of the sentence is true." The primary synonyms for inasmuch are "because" or "since." Thus the clear meaning of the declarative sentence in the U.N. Declaration is to ban all forms of human cloning (reproductive and therapeutic) because (or since) they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life.

Read the entire article on the Weekly Standard website (new window will open).

Posted: 22-Mar-05



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