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Noxious Nitschke: Euthanasia advocates work to make suicide easy

Wesley J. Smith

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The international euthanasia movement's first principle is radical individualism. The idea is that we each own our own body and hence should be able to do what we choose with our physical self -- including destroy it. Not only that, but if we want to die, liberty dictates that we should have ready access to a "good death," a demise that is peaceful and pain-free.

Most euthanasia advocates are not so blunt about this, of course, since candor about these matters would likely be detrimental to their movement's political health. But there are a few activists whose public advocacy -- and their general acceptance by the international euthanasia movement -- demonstrates the ultimate place to which legalized euthanasia would likely take us.

Jack Kevorkian was one such activist..Phillip Nitschke is another prominent euthanasia advocate who reveals the euthanasia movement's radical individualist mindset. Nitschke is known as the Jack Kevorkian of Australia, and for good reason: He believes in death-on-demand. And like Kevorkian, he has not limited his "death counseling" to the terminally ill. This included, most notoriously, a woman named Nancy Crick who made headlines when she announced on Australian television and internationally through her website that she would commit assisted suicide because she had terminal cancer. But when her autopsy showed she was cancer free, Nitschke admitted he and Crick had known all along that she wasn't dying but pronounced that medical fact "irrelevant" because she wanted to die.

Read this article on the National Review website (new window will open).

Posted: 3 Jul, 05



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