OrthodoxyToday.org
Commentary on social and moral issues of the day


Reporting on the 'New Faithful' in America: Journalist chronicles the trend toward traditional religion and practices

Colleen Carroll Campbell

  • Print this page
  • Email this page
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Bookmark and Share

The new revival

A growing number of today's young adults are adopting the teachings and traditions of an orthodox Christian faith. Their grassroots religious revival, which has been brewing for several years, is now manifesting itself more visibly. Private conversion experiences are evolving into public declarations of faith. Amorphous longing for God is developing into defined religious conviction. And the spiritual search of a growing number of young Americans is culminating in commitments to traditional religion and morality -- commitments that have the potential to significantly impact the broader culture.

I witnessed this trend while traveling across America, talking to young adults about their religious beliefs and practices while researching my book, "The New Faithful."

These new faithful, as I call them, are the children of the Baby Boomers -- a generation famous for its eclectic spiritual journeys, situational ethics, and deep distrust of tradition. Yet many of today's young adults are not embracing the hippie ethos of their parents' generation. Instead, they are embracing traditional morality and religion. Their choice arises not from fear, ignorance, or nostalgia. It springs from an intense and abiding hunger for God, and a deep disillusionment with what they view as the God-substitutes of our post-modern culture.

These young men and women have not seen too little of a secular, hedonistic society to understand its allure. They have seen too much to believe its promises. They have turned instead to an older promise, rooted in the traditions their parents rejected: the promise of a life guided by a transcendent vision and ordered by absolute truth.

These new faithful crave experiential knowledge of God and an emotional connection to Him. Most also hunger for sound doctrine and firm moral guidance. They ask tough questions and they expect serious answers. And unlike the Baby Boomers, who tended to reject the trappings and demands of orthodox religion, these new faithful gravitate to the most demanding forms of religious observance, the most intellectually rigorous faith formation, and the most ancient Church traditions.

Read the entire article on the Facsnet website.

Posted: 10/13/04



Copyright 2001-2014 OrthodoxyToday.org. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of this article is subject to the policy of the individual copyright holder. Follow copyright link for details.
Copyright 2001-2014 OrthodoxyToday.org. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of this article is subject to the policy of the individual copyright holder. See OrthodoxyToday.org for details.


Article link: